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be able to do this. bear in mind, this is not the egypt of hosey you in barrack. the egyptian government now are muzz lum brotherhood, and israel is in a less-tenable negotiating position and they remain military strong but do they want to go in on the ground take hundreds of thousands of casualties? that they've within boehnered will cause them to lose the international support they have. it's one of those 50-50 chance things but it's looking like everybody is looking fair way out. the question is, in a region like this, is there a way out. >> schieffer: well allen pizzey, who always shows up in the worst place where's the workforce things are going on, thank you. cbs news correspondent charlie dag tais on the other side of the border in gaza. charlie, bring us up to speed. what is the situation like there. >> reporter: well, the mood here is extremely teps, and the biggest worry is this dangerous and unpredictable situation may be about to get worse. as we drove through the northern part gaza strip, we were shown a couple of bombed out buildings, and one looked to be three or four stor
: in the middle of all of this, it's a very unstable and frankly, unpredictable egypt. and it could be the key. >> yeah. egypt is absolutely a key player in this. right now it's new muslim brotherhood president, morsi, appears to be playing both sides. he has reportedly quietly given the green light to his intelligence services to put pressure on hamas to scale back on those rocket attacks, while publicly he is sending his prime minister to the gaza strip tomorrow in what will clearly be a show of solidarity with the palestinians. now, the egyptian calculation may be that by having their prime minister there, they will cause a pause in the fighting because israel will be reluctant to carry on with the air strikes and launch any kind of ground invasion while such a high ranking egyptian politician is there. that might, of course, help the palestinians. on the other hand, any pause in the fighting also gives a little more time for diplomacy to start work. but watching what egypt's leaders say and do in the next few days is going to be key in what happens next in this very tense situation. shep.
today. >> charlie d'agata in gaza city, thanks. >>> there's new pressure for egypt to step up and negotiate an end to the current round of fighting. this morning there are conflicting reports out of cairo that israel and gaza could be close to a truce. clarissa ward is in the egyptian capital. good morning, clarissa. >> reporter: good morning, charlie and norah. the egyptian president morsi has said repeatedly he hopes to announce a cease-fire agreement imminently. but cbs news has spoken to a source very close to the hamas delegation here in cairo. they said that so far these talks are not going anywhere. now, one of the reasons for that may be that hamas is making some pretty big demands in exchange for stopping its rocket attacks on israel. primarily it wants an end to the israeli blockade of the gaza strip. israel unlikely to budge on that issue because of fears that lifting the blockade would lead to an influx of weapons that could get into the hands of militants inside gaza. as you said, u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon is on his way to cairo now for talks as diplomati
, between israel and the palestinians, since egypt's leadership has changed. and we know that egypt has a different reaction to this than they did under president morsi than they had in the past under former president mubarak? >> reporter: absolutely. on a few different fronts. one, the leadership here, it's currently aligned with the one that runs egypt. and president morsi comes from that. and the more important one, for the past several days they've been trying to mediate between the palestinian faction in israel. they reached a truce, but that truce didn't hold for long. more importantly, israel is trying to resume a bit of a leadership role. yesterday, they lobbied to secure the security council. and also they convened with the arab league to try to put an end to the barrage of fire. some for its part are calling on egypt to sever ties with israel. that would be a major setback for the united states because the israeli/egyptian peace treaty has been a cornerstone of u.s. policy in the middle east. >> ayman, we'll be checking in with you all day, i imagine. thanks very much. >>> mov
in egypt. so that's where i think everybody would like to see it head. obama has worked hard to talk to them to try to steer it in that direction. will that happen? >> the most phones call that secretary clinton has made from the road have been to her counter-part in egypt. and they have been very clear that egypt has a relationship, they have the credibility and influence in the region to push hamas to stop the attacks. now, there is also a fair amount of funding being held up in washington right now that the egyptians need very immediately. remember, they weren't just one of the top recipients of foreign aid. they have a funding crisis. they have literally been to the point where they have had problems paying bills. so there is some immediate leverage to gets them to act immediately. whether that ends up being effective or not is another question. >> schieffer: well, do we think the administration-- obviously, i would guess they're advising the israelis not to invade. but what beyond that are they trying to do? is this an opening to start a-- the peace process to get it started aga
to egypt's president morsi. this is the first major flare up of israel-policemen since morsi gained control of egypt. >>> coming up on the morning news, trouble for an accused masked shooter. why a court hearing was delayed for james holmes the suspected gunman in the colorado movie theater shooting and later luck running you want for two brothers trying to pull off a multimillion dollar lottery scheme. this is the "cbs morning news." mother: this is george. he is a good little monkey and always very curious. one day george got an important letter... he's built a rocket ship to travel into space. girl: google, how far is earth to the moon? google voice response: moon is 238,900 miles... mother vo: the great moment had come... ...3...2...1. ♪ have led to an increase intands clinical depression. drug and alcohol abuse is up. and those dealing with grief don't have access to the professional help they need. when you see these issues, do you want to walk away or step up? with a degree in the field of counseling or psychology from capella university, you'll have the knowledge to make a differe
saw this massive push in this really indigenous push within egypt, tunisia, and other democratic governments. some of those movements have had potentially scary things. there are some islamic fundamentalist parties that we do not have great relationships with and they understand that can be confusing thing. what obama has tried to do and in his famous speech in cairo is that he wants to deal with these countries and talk to the electorate. now we have an entirely different landscape, but in egypt, libya, and tunisia. relationship with these countries, these are countries with democratic governments. some of them have chosen paths that are a little more moderate, some leaning a little bit more to the fundamentalist side, but they're still fundamentally democratic and that will be a big challenge for the obama administration. host: its next for egypt? -- what is next for egypt? ?uest: in terms of ta host: the obama administration. guest: they still need to establish some of the legitimate government there. after the incredibly uplifting movements in it to rear square, it has devolv
when there will be a need. >> suarez: with today's escalation, egypt pressed for an end to the israeli air strikes. today, palestinian president mahmoud abbas asked the arab league to call an urgent meeting to discuss the strikes, and united nations chief ban ki-moon called for a "de-escalation of tensions." >> suarez: for more, i'm joined by phone with sheera frenkel, middle east correspondent for the "times of london" in jerusalem. sheera, we reported on the rising tensions between the israelis and the palestinians in gaza. but was there something in particular that set this off? >> in the last three or four hours that there have been a slowdown in hostilities between israel and the gaza strip. in fact, earlier in today there had been no exchanges of violence across the border. but when i spoke to officials about why they decided to start targeted assassinations and launch the operation in gaza, their answer was actually intelligence data they had received that militants in gaza had been smuggling in more high tech weapons and that it would really create damage to the military arsena
. they control hamas. they're right now agitating. they're agitating probably egypt. >> lebanon presumably? >> yeah. yeah. >> what concerns me as somebody who's covered this story for a long time, if tensions heat up with hamas and gaza, heat up with hezbollah from lebanon and iran working on its nuclear program, look what's happening israel's neighbor in the north, syria, there's potential there are for huge explosion. >> yeah. there's a powder keg potential. there's another reason why this administration has leverage, strength now that the president won should push once again for an israeli/palestinian agreement. >> with the palestinian authority. >> with the plo, two-state solution. push that. get the israeli supportive. but right now i can understand what israel's doing, defending itself. >> two years ago almost to the day you went to north korea. i went with you. spent six days in pyongyang. since then there's a new leader, kim jong-un, the young man now the leader of north korea. you studied this closely. i'm curious, do you see significant changes yet positive changes, negative chan
request. egypt has recalled the ambassador to israel following the killing of a top hamas leader. the palestinian authority isialing the u.n. to condemn what it calls illegal criminal actions. israel says it's just defending itself and will do it again if necessary. leland vittert reports from jerusalem. >> from an israeli drone you can see the car of hamas' military commander driving along a quiet street in gaza city. the missile appeared to come out of nowhere. he didn't have a chance. his car burped to a shell. within hours the israeli air strike killed two more senior hamas militants and destroyed major weapon store ran facility. the assassination marked the start of operation pillar of cloud against hamas and islamic jihad in response to a week of militant rockets launched in southern israel. and the missile attack of an army jeep as shown in this video provided by the attacke attackers. at a press conference israel's prime minister promised "anything needed to defend our citizens." he continued we are ready to bring in more forces if needed. alluding to a ground defense tha
. >> how hard was it to get in from egypt? >> a lot of bureaucratic hassles the border is still apparently controlled by the old security services who were under mubarak, close to assad, the caa. it is hard to know how much is bureaucrats try to make life difficult dullish trying to make life difficult, and how much is planned harassment. for the gazans, it is no joke. if you want to go somethinthrouh something like past for control, is like three hours. >> while you're there, another freedom flotilla ship tried to get in from scandinavia. what was the response on land? >> it was a lot of excitement. people are very happy to know that someone knows they are there, and that people are willing to risk something. it is not a joke. they're trying to break through. we had a press conference at the port. to my amazement, it was uncovered in the most reactionary newspaper in israel. but for the people there, it is just a sign that they have not been forgotten, maybe they will get out. >> we're speaking to the first time after president obama was reelected read your thoughts? >> their two good thi
behind palestinianian civilians. but the government in egypt, which was backed by the administration, has condemned israel, not hamas. the terrorist group hamas doesn't want peace with israel. it wants war. it kills israeli citizens and then hides behinds the skirts of palestinian women. israel has the moral right and duty to defend itself from the bar barrack hamas. the united states should be in total support of israel, our ally. the u.s. should be bold in its condemnation of hamas and the u.s. should be bold in this continuing war by terrorist, like hamas, on civilized nations and that's just the way it is. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from oregon rise? the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. blumenauer: thank you, madam speaker. perhaps one of the best parts of serving in congress is the access to our library, the library of congress, the dedicated staff at c.r.s., the magnificent reading room. the library of congress is a national treasure. and leading the library of congress is dr. james billington. he was a scholar and institutional leader be
commander killed wednesday in an air strike. you see that. leaders in neighboring egypt warn the violence could soon escalate out of control. >>> and hurricane sandy exposed just how vulnerable millions of americans are to power outages. but that could just be the iceberg's tip. a new federal study warns a terrorist attack on the u.s. power grid could plunge parts of the country into darkness for weeks or even months because key pieces of equipment are unguarded and lack the technology needed to stop outages from spreading. >>> new questions about safety of the popular energy drinks. the fda investigating reports that the supercaffeinated 5-hour energy drink could be linked to as many as 13 deaths. the drinksmaker denies any proven connection to its products and those cases. >>> a group is urging the government to crack down on new version of cracker jacks about to hit stores. it has new flavors with extra pop, with caffeine. why we are caffeinating cracker jacks is beyond me. but the makers insist the snack won't be marketed to children. >>> here's diane sawyer with a preview of tonight'
with the hopes of brokering a truce and sending a message to palestinians. egypt is standing by the people of gaza in their pain, he said. people took advantage of the relative lull in violence to stock up on whatever they could. since israel began attacks, getting food has become harder and more expensive this man tells me, but the ceasefire didn't hold. israel announced on twitter hamas hadn't stopped firing into southern israel, and israel fired into gaza where the death toll is 19, including five children. the latest violence exploded when they fired the chief thursday, a barrage of rockets and missiles. israeli air force calling out precision strikes. in crowded gaza, the civilians bear the brunt. this child, son of a local bbc technician was 11 months old when he was killed by an israeli air strike. savannah, we've been speaking to palestinians here, and the sense they have is fear and anxiety. they're extremely afraid of what could be coming next on the horizon. the focus is what is it going to take to break the impact between the palestinian fax and the israeli government. so far,
. this will be his first press conference since that september 11th attack in egypt that killed u.s. ambassador chris stevens and three other americans. as well, would you expect them to be asked about cabinet -- or, pardon me -- in libya, and you would expect him to be asked about the cab -- potential cabinet shake-ups as well. you said he hasn't had an extended press conference since march. that's true. there are a lot of outstanding questions, and he will be asked probably about all of them today, suzanne. >> imagine it's going to be taking a while to get through all of these, and the priorities -- i mean, you're right. he hasn't really faced the press for a lot of those tough questions in a long time. do we think that now entering a second administration he is going to feel more comfortable in taking questions from the press corps, or is he going to take a more friendly, you know, audience when he goes to "the view" or late-night comedy shows instead? >> you know, i don't know. obviously we saw -- i don't think we're going to be seeing him as much on, say, "the view" and some of the lighter shows
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)

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